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MOT Rule Changes: 20th May 2018

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routemaster1   
Fri May 18 2018, 02:37am
Member No: #574
Joined: Jul 08 2007
Location: Dorset
The rules are changing for MOTs.

- Click Here -

A significant one is the one to do with emissions.

'Your vehicle will get a major fault if the MOT tester:

can see smoke of any colour coming from the exhaust
finds evidence that the DPF has been tampered with'

A major fault is essentially a fail. This will make a de-catted car unusable (and was already illegal) but it is now presumably inspected.
Magistrate   
Fri May 18 2018, 04:54am
Member No: #1731
Joined: Dec 15 2007
Location: Walsall West Midlands
Excellent, long awaited news to rid the road of those cars that leave a trail of choking smoke behind them and those that break the law by disabling their DPFs and then driving on the highway.Fortunately, my 20yr old BMW 318 tds died last year after a terminal catastrophic oil leak!
BigJohnD   
Fri May 18 2018, 08:47am

Member No: #82
Joined: Jan 22 2007
Location: Hoylake
routemaster1 wrote ...

finds evidence that the DPF has been tampered with

Interesting phrase. Some may have been cleaned or replaced - let's hope the tester can tell the difference.
rusky   
Fri May 18 2018, 09:56am
Member No: #27768
Joined: Oct 13 2012
Location: Hove
Magistrate wrote ...

Excellent, long awaited news to rid the road of those cars that leave a trail of choking smoke behind them and those that break the law by disabling their DPFs and then driving on the highway.Fortunately, my 20yr old BMW 318 tds died last year after a terminal catastrophic oil leak!

You mean it bled to death
Magistrate   
Fri May 18 2018, 10:07am
Member No: #1731
Joined: Dec 15 2007
Location: Walsall West Midlands
rusky wrote ...

Magistrate wrote ...

Excellent, long awaited news to rid the road of those cars that leave a trail of choking smoke behind them and those that break the law by disabling their DPFs and then driving on the highway.Fortunately, my 20yr old BMW 318 tds died last year after a terminal catastrophic oil leak!

You mean it bled to death


Sadly yes, owned from new 200,000 miles and never let me down passing every MOT with only routine servicing. Best car I have ever owned and still grieving at its loss.
FrankBullitt   
Fri May 18 2018, 12:29pm

Member No: #19238
Joined: Apr 12 2011
Location: Cambridgeshire
I assume the smoke will be tested without the engine under load, in which case this is unlikely to catch many out to be honest.
routemaster1   
Mon May 21 2018, 08:20am
Member No: #574
Joined: Jul 08 2007
Location: Dorset
One thing that has always bothered me about an MOT test is whether, with a couple of weeks left on your current MOT, you can drive your car for the remainder of the old MOT if your car fails. According to what I have read even VOSA have published contradictory information. So now we have two categories of fault that will fail an MOT, dangerous and major.

Dangerous A direct and immediate risk to road safety or has a serious impact on the environment.

Do not drive the vehicle until it’s been repaired. Fail

Major It may affect the vehicle’s safety, put other road users at risk or have an impact on the environment.

Repair it immediately. Fail

So my question is, if both types of fault cause a fail, does dangerous mean essentially that you cannot drive your car at all, and major that you can continue driving until the old certificate expires but repair it as soon as practicable.

I was in a situation the other day where, at a service, not MOT, I was told I had a potentially dangerous fault, and was quote a huge main dealer price to get it sorted, and I got it done a few days later elsewhere for way under half the main dealer price! This could easily be the scenario at MOT time.

And if you cannot continue to drive the car, what is the point of having dangerous and serious faults!
FrankBullitt   
Mon May 21 2018, 08:52am

Member No: #19238
Joined: Apr 12 2011
Location: Cambridgeshire
I saw debate of this on another forum and the answer seems to be that you can drive the car but you are at risk of being caught on ANPR and having to explain to the police that you can drive with the defect identified - the old MOT doesn’t ‘disappear’ but it’s arguable that the new MOT should overwrite this.

In the case of, say, a blown bulb this would possibly be okay but in the case of, say, a bald tyre then clearly you would be prosecuted for this but that is the case MOT or not. The one I found most interesting was that if your MOT failure was for a bald tyre and you had it replaced but hadn’t got around to a retest MOT the legal advice was that your old MOT covers you.

On the new test the check for smoke is only on EU5 and 6 cars (ie with a DPF) which a lot of people seem to have missed
 

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