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DPF removal/remapping (Depollution fault/EGR valve cleaning/change)

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bigstan   
Tue Nov 29 2011, 08:03am
Member No: #18724
Joined: Mar 13 2011
Location: Runcorn
Anybody had their DPF filter removed/remapped?

Would like to know peoples thoughts or experiences.

Thanks!
gmerry   
Tue Nov 29 2011, 09:10am
Member No: #11625
Joined: Nov 30 2009
Location: aberdeen
There have been reports in this forum of a sucessful DPF removal and rewriting the software so that the car doesnt throw up error codes etc.

Personally I think it is a bit socially irresponsible to inflict diesel combustion particulates on your fellow man, especially if you live in a city. I can remember being choked and made quite ill cycling in London prior to congestion charging and when most diesel exhausts were completely untreated. If there are any medical people here, I'm sure they could chip in with the cardio-vascular harm caused by particulates. With PSA's DPF system, there should not be any real reason to want to remove the DPF.

Regards
G
Biohead   
Tue Nov 29 2011, 10:30am

Member No: #6049
Joined: Nov 05 2008
Location: Bracknell
Possible to remove it, but it's not cheap and there aren't really big gains to be had from it either if that's what you're looking for.
bigstan   
Tue Nov 29 2011, 11:02am
Member No: #18724
Joined: Mar 13 2011
Location: Runcorn
Not looking for gains in mpg or bhp, just less headaches and costs with all the lovely DPF problems!!
Commodore   
Tue Nov 29 2011, 11:29am
Member No: #21107
Joined: Jul 31 2011
Location: Ruislip, Middlesex
bigstan wrote ...

Not looking for gains in mpg or bhp, just less headaches and costs with all the lovely DPF problems!!

Then leave it alone. Removing it will only create headaches and potential problems.

Unlike some other DPF implementations (the DPF on the Mazda 6 comes to mind) you won't have many issues with the PSA DPF. Unlike many others, the DPF on a C4 is far more tolerant of large amounts of city driving (I know from experience). Just make sure you do the occasional motorway run to regenerate it and you'll be fine.
jon2CV   
Tue Nov 29 2011, 11:30am
What is it? Where is it? What does it do? Does it need replacing? If so, how much? What 'lovely problems' does it present? Thanks in advance, I'm just curious/learning
Stuey   
Tue Nov 29 2011, 11:31am
Member No: #84
Joined: Jan 24 2007
Location: Ilkeston, Derbyshire
as far as I can tell (and pretty much backed up my experiences working at Ford) a good 90% of DPF problems come from cars not getting through the cycles and getting blocked with all the garbage from the engine. They just need a good run to clear their lungs out. The 2.0 TDCi Ford engine was a pain in the backside for DPF faults. The fix? Take it round the back, out of customers eye lines and rev the nuts off it for a few minutes. It gets the exhaust hot enough for it to go through the burn cycle and clears it out.

We talk often about the merits of the Italian tune up, as far as I'm concerned this is pretty decent fix for a lot of engine related problems. Off topic slightly but I have what feels like a slipping clutch in my petrol, the fix to make it go away? Drive it like you stole it for 10 mins or so and viola! Diesel engine are made and designed for long motorway cruises, whilst they can, they are not designed for living in towns and cities tootling around in traffic.

I'm sure a few of you will jump on this and call me daft but I'm not fussed, just my observations.

Rant over.
gmerry   
Tue Nov 29 2011, 11:34am
Member No: #11625
Joined: Nov 30 2009
Location: aberdeen
Bigstan, one other thing you can do to avoid DPF problems (and a lot of other problems as well) and that is to use Low SAPs engine oil (ACEA C2 specification).

Might cost you an extra £15/ change but will save a lot of the other grief and stop your DPF blocking.

Regards
G
Biohead   
Tue Nov 29 2011, 11:40am

Member No: #6049
Joined: Nov 05 2008
Location: Bracknell
As others have already said, the PSA DPF is one of the best out there.

It differs from the others in that the exhaust gases are artificially made higher by usage of an additive, and not having to physically work the engine hard constantly.

You'd honestly be surprised by how little DPFs have had to be completely replaced on this forum.
Dave_Retired.   
Tue Nov 29 2011, 12:46pm

Member No: #1
Joined: Aug 07 2006
Location: Northumberland
jon2CV wrote ...

What is it? Where is it? What does it do? Does it need replacing? If so, how much? What 'lovely problems' does it present? Thanks in advance, I'm just curious/learning

If you notice in some peoples posts words turn a shade of red. That means they are links you can click. DPFs goes to: - Click Here -
bigstan   
Tue Nov 29 2011, 12:52pm
Member No: #18724
Joined: Mar 13 2011
Location: Runcorn
This answer is long and hard to respond to I know, so I apologise. But bear with me I will try to explain my reasoning.

To be perfectly honest, it's probably a mixture of several reasons why I have asked this question, and since I bought the car in March I have had several problems which have basically made me lose 100% faith in this car and Citroen. But before you get your guns out, yes I do know it's the luck of the draw with buying used cars, but it's my first Citroen, so I have nothing else to go by.

Now I understand the Low SAPS oil stuff and more regular than stated service intervals, I'm guessing the previous owner didn't follow these well as I have a really noisy turbo (whatever level of whistle you are thinking, multiply it by 5 and you're nearly there) with slight play in the impeller. So I am looking at £600-700 refurbed turbo job in the coming months (sooner if the 'lovely' thing decides to pack in). I have read all the threads on turbo failures and oil maintenance.

I have had electrical gremlins like you wouldn't believe, the car would not start for 3-4 days then work fine for 3-4 weeks, repeatedly. Together with Depollution errors, I had ESP/ABS, ECU and Cruise control errors too. A mis-diagnosis of a fuse box (+£300) and then in-depth fault finding plus part (ABS control module) by Citroen cost me a further £450 to fix the non-starting. (2months ago).

The Depollution System Faulty and ESP/ABS Fault errors have started to reappear.

A regen isn't the answer as I have just been from Liverpool to London and back (twice) in 4 days, driving at night, so good motorway runs with high speeds, with the regen in mind.

Now its on 75000, would I get an EOLYS fluid warning if the additive is low or a Depollution System Faulty error, or even a blocked filter message? That refill would be about £150-200 service at Citroen, am I right?

If it's not that, after reading MANY of the threads regarding Depollution and ESP/ABS faults, my problem could be one of MANY LOVELY things. Which most are costly, without even considering labour/diagnosis charges.

So my question about DPF removal is based on paying maybe £200-250 for the removal option instead. As sceptical as I am being, I am stuck in a corner.

(Bearing in mind am I bl00dy student!)
trev h   
Tue Nov 29 2011, 12:57pm
Member No: #10864
Joined: Sep 11 2009
Location: kent/se london
As stuey says above a good blast down the motorway generally clears most problems.

There was an article in the papers a couple of weeks ago where a customer (estate agent) bought a new jag xf, after a short period of time he had the dreaded DPF light come on took it to jag who cleared the fault, this occured again & again a total of 13 times each time cleared by jag. After the last attempt the dealer contacted jag technical who told the dealers they wouldn't cover anymore DPF faults on the car as "it is the customers fault for not driving it properly" he only used it to trundle round town & not driven as it should be.

I wonder if this could be picked up by other manufacturers & use it as an excuse.

On a seperate note i live near a large cemetery & have noticed new stretched limo jags used as funeral cars, dont know if they are petrol or diesel, if they are diesel wonder what they would be told regarding not being driven properly.
PentlandC4   
Tue Nov 29 2011, 01:12pm
Member No: #13613
Joined: May 08 2010
Location: Deepest Wiltshire
Excuse me for asking, Bigstan, but does your C4 actually have a DPFS? Looking back to some of your earlier posts, your car is a 2004 1.6 HDi.
bigstan   
Tue Nov 29 2011, 01:20pm
Member No: #18724
Joined: Mar 13 2011
Location: Runcorn
@Pentland C4

Im actually assuming so, but basically based on the citroen service mechanic telling me I need to give it a blast on the open road when I very first took it in.

I will have to go out and have a look, you have got me doubting it now.
gmerry   
Tue Nov 29 2011, 01:26pm
Member No: #11625
Joined: Nov 30 2009
Location: aberdeen
Pentland is probably right re your car not having a DPF. What is your engine code, just give us the part of the VIN that looks like HY or HX.

I guess you need to consider whether to persevere with the car or treat it as an economic write off?

Regards
G
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